Protecting children from the effects of negative digital baggage

February 28, 2018 | Singapore | Industry Insights

As adults, we are gradually coming to terms with this effect and learning to manage our digital lives, but what about our children?

Every product, service, or experience we interact with today creates some type of digital record, whether we like it or not. As adults, we are gradually coming to terms with this effect and learning to manage our digital lives, but what about our children? Employers are already making hiring decisions influenced by search results. Could this extend to schools, health care, and governments? Will children be denied entry to a school because of how much time they spent binge-watching videos, or find it difficult to run for office because of a video made when they were seven?

Online information, or digital baggage, can be positive, negative, or neutral. As our children go on their increasingly digital journey through life, what are they packing for their trip? Likely, it will be a combination of mostly innocuous and trivial things, some positive and amazing ones that will help them on their journey, and some negative items that could weigh them down. Unfortunately, we predict that many future adults will suffer from negative digital baggage, even if it comes about without their intention.

As parents, our challenge is to help our children navigate this new world, in which they can be tracked almost from the moment of conception. Remember that story from 2012 about a girl who received coupons from a retailer for pregnancy-related items before she acknowledged that she was pregnant?

To help our children, we need to understand the kinds of digital artefacts that are being captured and stored. There are generally three types: explicit, implicit, and inadvertent.

Explicit content is all of those things that happen after you click the “I Agree” button on the terms and conditions or end user license agreement. Given recent breaches, it seems that anything stored online will at some point be hacked, so why not assume that from the beginning? If they really want to, a prospective employer may be able to find out what content you created, your social habits, and a host of other data points. This is an area that parents (at least initially) have a lot of control and influence over, and can teach and model good habits. Are you buying “M”-rated games for your 10-year-old, or letting your teens post videos without some oversight? Sadly, what happens online is not private, and there could eventually be consequences.

Implicit content is anything you do or say in an otherwise public place, which could be photographed, recorded, or somehow documented. This ranges from acting silly to drinking or taking drugs, but also includes what people say, post, tweet, etc. in public or online. We do not think that childlike behaviour (by children) is going to be frequently or successfully used against people in the future, so we can still let our kids be kids.

Inadvertent content is the danger area. These are items that were intended to remain private, or were never expected to be captured. Unfortunately, inadvertent content is becoming increasingly common, as organizations of all types (accidentally or on purpose) bend and break their own privacy agreements in a quest to capture more about us.

Whether with a toy, a tablet, a TV, a home speaker, or some other device, someone is capturing your child’s words and actions and sending them to the cloud. This is the most challenging part of the digital journey, and one that we must manage vigilantly. Pay attention to what you buy and install, turn off unnecessary features, and change the default passwords to something much stronger!

Our children face an amazing potential future, full of wonderful gadgets, supportive services, and amazing experiences. Let’s teach them at home to pack their digital backpacks so that they can make the most of it.

In the corporate world, McAfee predicts that the May 2018 implementation of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) could play an important role in setting ground rules on the handling of both consumer data and user generated content in the years to come.

The new regulatory regime impacts companies that either have a business presence in EU countries, or process the personal data of EU residents, meaning that companies from around the world will be compelled to adjust the way in which they process, store, and protect customers’ personal data. Forward-looking businesses can leverage this to set best practices that benefit customers using consumer appliances, content generating app platforms, and the online cloud-based services behind them.

In this regard, the year 2018 may well best be remembered for whether consumers truly have the right to be forgotten.



For more insights on cybersecurity, join McAfee Asia Pacific’s Chief Technology Officer, Ian Yip, at ConnecTechAsia Summit 2018’s EmergingTech Track. Marina Bay Sands, 26 June 2018.

Delegates may register for the Summit here.

Exhibitor
Advisory
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  3. Questionable Travel booking practice by Travel Era. Click here for more info.